L.O.Q.Shun

Yesterday marked the start of a week for premieres including:

– He korokoro tūī : a soundscape for a site-specific dance work by Karen Barbour, featuring taonga puoro by Alistair Fraser. This will be premiered at a conference held at Waikato University.

Flutter and Cut Away the Masts on Saturday at the Otago Museum.

But first, was the premiere of a new vocal piece L.O.Q.Shun premiered on Radio NZ on Sunday afternoon during the Standing Room Only show. It was part of a larger interview about my ongoing work as the Mozart Fellow.

You can check out the full interview here:
http://www.radionz.co.nz/audio/remote-player?id=20158331

This piece was developed through discussions with the singer Julia Booth about the work of Alexander Melville Bell on the study of elocution. We started talking about creating a loop-based performance piece in November 2013, and finally ended up in November 2014 with a completed recording of the work!

I had found a book online that he had written called “The Principles of Elocution” from 1887, and based the text of snippets from that book – particularly the second on difficult combinations.
The work is all voices (with reverb and delay effects).
Two vocalists:
soprano – Julia Booth
vocal noises – Jeremy Mayall

Here the work in the audio player below:

The Birth (a performance piece)

I am currently in the process of finalising the video of my most recent composition for my PhD portfolio… it is sometimes a long process, but totally worth it to have a visual as well as aural record of my work.

My PhD portfolio is aiming to explore the possibilities cross-genre hybridity in new music composition. The research methodology is practice-based, where the compositions make up the bulk of the thesis.  One of these pieces is called The Birth.

The Birth is a multimedia performance piece which combines a number of forces: a mixed ensemble of musicians (from both classical and popular traditions); video projection; dance; theatre; opera singers; circus performers; and pyrotechnics. Musically it brings together elements from the genres of 20th Century chamber opera, narrative film score, minimalism, rock and electronica and puts them together with the tradition of the narrator (from film and theatre) to help tell the story.

The story is a new take on the age old myths of creation and the battle of good vs. evil. It features a libretto by Shoshana Sachi, a video backdrop by Dan Inglis, and pyrotechnics from Van Tiel Pyrotechnics.

Here is a video from the world premiere performance at the University of Waikato Blues Awards:

Performance video put together by the good folks at Chasing Time Productions