Back in Hamilton

Now that we are back in Hamilton, a bunch of interesting things have been taking place.

First, I am now working at the School of Media Arts, Wintec as an Academic Staff Member in the Music Department and Research Leader for the School. It is an exciting challenge, and is great to be working in a new environment.

Penny Black – the movie has been on a nationwide cinema tour. This is still going, so go to the tour page for more information!

 

DarkMatter – An event in the Dunedin Fringe Festival. 
Afterburner presents a light and performance installation pushing the boundaries of seeing. Using low level light, projection and sound, Afterburner awaken the possibilities of the unseen, imagining realms beyond sight, just on the verge of seeing. Dark Matter is a visual experience changing how we might see space and light as well as challenging the senses to enter into the experience.
Afterburner comprises of longterm founder and award winning lighting designer Martyn Roberts,with sound from Jeremy Mayall and dancers Katherine Kennedy and Megan Wilson.

 

All Good Poems Wear Classical Shoes – Another event in the Dunedin Fringe Festival
Sophie Morris sings new compositions from Anthony Ritchie, Jeremy Mayall and Sam Van Betuw. The new works are based on Poem texts from Poets David Eggleton, Ian Loughran, Emma Neale and Sue Wootton.

 

CONVERSATIONS: A new album featuring a number of collaborations for solo instrument and electronics. Featuring a number of extremely talented and generous performers. Here is the cover art, designed by Dan Inglis:

 

Film, Archive and Music Lab: I was lucky enough to have been one of 16 artists selected by the British Council and the British Film Institute to explore the creative potential of collaboration between the worlds of cinema, film archive and music. The 16 participants included music makers, film makers and video game composers – and we took part in a series of workshops, masterclasses, screenings and networking events all with the aim of increasing opportunities for cross-sector work, while providing a fertile breeding ground for future collaborations.

 

“Te ngao o te ao turoa” – it was a real honour to present the premiere of this new work for taonga puoro and electronics at the launch of the new University of Waikato Taonga Puoro collection. The piece was created and performed in collaboration with Horomona Horo.

 

Glimmer – an interactive light and sound installation created with Joe Citizen and Jason Long as a part of the Hamilton Fringe Festival at the Band Rotunda in town. A great experience for the young and young-at-heart!

 

And coming up!!

The premiere of a piece for bassoon and FX pedals – “The Effect of Bundled Sticks on Sound”! This piece will be premiered by Ben Hoadley at St Andrews on the Terrace in Wellington as part of the NZ Music for Woodwind Concert.

-still-

As a bit of creative fun I decided to create a piece using some taonga puoro recordings I had made with Alistair Fraser. I listened through the recordings, and then started to create a piano piece that would allow Alistairs musical gestures to flow naturally and create a sense of balance between the taonga puoro and the ‘western’ musical parts.

The picture is from the trek in the Himalayas – a path leading down to Namche Bazaar. It seemed appropriate for the feel of the piece.

You can listen to that track here:

He korokoro tūī (remix)

At the end of last year I had the opportunity to create a soundscape for a new contemporary dance work “Whenua” by Karen Barbour.

The work was premiered at a conference at Waikato University.

In the recording and creation of this piece I had the privilege of working with Alistair Fraser playing his selection of taonga puoro. We recorded his parts at the University of Otago Music Department Albany Street Studios with Stephen Stedman.

Have a listen to an edited remix version of the piece below:

The Long White Cloud (video)

This is the final video from the concert recordings.

At the concert this piece was performed under the title “They say a word is dead”. But after some discussions, and a long timing thinking about possibilities… the piece was re-worked, re-arranged and had some new parts written to make the piece better suited to support my PhD. Thus this new version took on a new focus and a new meaning – hence the new title.

The Long White Cloud – by Jeremy Mayall
for chamber ensemble

Featuring:
Lauren Grout – Flute
Adam Maha – Viola
Yotam Levy – Cello
Mike Booth – Trumpet
Chris Lam Sam – Keys
Chris McBride – Guitar
Nick Tipping – Bass
Brad Thomson – Drums
Jeremy Mayall – synths and electronics

and I was fortunate enough to be able to use the sounds and masterful playing of Richard Nunns on Taonga Puoro.

The Long White Cloud is my interpretation of NZ and it’s landscape and soundscape. This piece is a journey through the many sounds and worlds that this small land encompasses.

The piece is in 7 sections: 4 larger movements and 3 interludes.
Movement 1: At dawn with the Korimako
Interlude: The Tui’s call
Movement 2: Sea Chase
Interlude: A flightless night
Movement 3: Along the river Waikato
Interlude: Onomatopoeic Owls
Movement 4: Kokako, the bringer of water

This piece was written for a unique ensemble combining orchestral instruments with those from the worlds of rock, jazz and electronica. This suite combines a large number of genre inspirations, and exists in a world between traditional notation, guided improvisation, and studio construction. Unlike other pieces where the orchestral instruments provide a textural accompaniment (much like an expensive synthesizer) to existing ‘popular’ songs, this piece aims to give all the instruments equal placement in the overall composition. Through amplification and sound mixing the intricate textures from the flute, viola and cello should be able to exist comfortably with drums and distorted guitar.

The Long White Cloud from Jeremy Mayall on Vimeo.

Lighting: Aaron Chesham
Live Sound: Ben Mannell
Post-production audio mix: Jeremy Mayall

Camera Ops: Dan Inglis, Joe Hitchcock, Ben Woollen, Scott Granville, Ashton Ledger
Video Edit: Dan Inglis